FANDOM


"All precious things discovered late
To those that seek them issue forth,
For Love in sequel works with Fate,
And draws the veil from hidden worth.
"
Anne of the Island – Epigraph[src]

This is from "The Day-Dream" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. It opens the part called "The Arrival".[1]

"Harvest is ended and summer is gone."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 1: The Shadow of Change)[src]

Paraphrased from Jeremiah 8:20.[2]

"You'll always keep a corner for me, won't you, Di darling? Not the spare room, of course -- old maids can't aspire to spare rooms, and I shall be as 'umble as Uriah Heep, and quite content with a little over-the-porch or off-the-parlour cubby hole."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 1: The Shadow of Change)[src]

This is a reference to David Copperfield by Charles Dickens. In it, there is a character called Uriah Heep who is constantly claiming to be humble (he pronounces it "'umble").[3]

"Shoes and ships and sealing wax
And cabbages and kings,
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 1: The Shadow of Change)[src]

This is from "The Walrus and the Carpenter", stanza 11, by Lewis Carroll. "The Walrus and the Carpenter" is one of the poems in Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

"In imagination she sailed over storied seas that wash the distant shining shores of 'faery lands forlorn' ..."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 1: The Shadow of Change)[src]

This is from stanza seven of "Ode to a Nightingale", by John Keats.[4]

"And she was richer in those dreams than in realities; for things seen pass away, but the things that are unseen are eternal."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 1: The Shadow of Change)[src]

From 2 Corinthians 4:18.[5]

"The fatal apple of Eden couldn't have had a rarer flavour ..."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 2: Garlands of Autumn)[src]

Anne is referencing the old creation story in the book of Genesis, where Adam and Eve are punished for eating the fruit (sometimes assumed to be an apple, though it is never specifically stated) that grows on the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the Garden of Eden. This introduces sin into the world, and is what triggers God to banish Adam and Eve from the Garden. And since there is now sin in the world, there is also death, which may be why Anne referred to the apple as "fatal".

"Those apples have been as manna to a hungry soul."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 2: Garlands of Autumn)[src]

Anne is possibly referring to the period of time in the Old Testament when the Israelites ate the food God provided for them for forty years while they wandered in the desert. The food that came in the morning was called manna, and the food that came in the evening was quail.[6] Manna was thin flakes of bread, and literally came down from the skies. Both manna and quail fulfilled every need the Israelites had for food.

"Dora, like the immortal and most prudent Charlotte, who 'went on cutting bread and butter' when her frenzied lover's body had been carried past on a shutter, was one of those fortunate creatures who are seldom disturbed by anything."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 3: Greeting and Farewell)[src]

This is a reference to "The Sorrows of Werther", by William Makepeace Thackeray.[7]

"I feel like Byron's 'Childe Harold' – only it isn't really my 'native shore' that I'm watching."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 3: Greeting and Farewell)[src]

This is a reference to Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, by George Gordon, Lord Byron. The "native shore" quote comes from Canto the First, part XIII.[8]

"And on Inkerman yet the wild bramble is gory,
And those bleak heights henceforth shall be famous in story.
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 4: April's Lady)[src]

These lines which Anne quotes are from Lucile by Owen Meredith (Canto VI, Part VII).[9]

"... she saw the Kingsport Harbour of nearly a century agone. Out of the mist came slowly a great frigate, brilliant with 'the meteor flag of England'."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 4: April's Lady)[src]

The line is from "Ye Mariners of England: A Naval Old Ode" by Thomas Campbell.[10]

"And so in mountain solitudes o'ertaken
As by some spell divine,
Their cares drop from them like the needles shaken
From out the gusty pine.
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 6: In the Park)[src]

This is the seventh stanza of the poem "Dickens in Camp", by Bret Harte.[11]

"Let's go home around by Spofford Avenue. We can see all 'the handsome houses where the wealthy nobles dwell'."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 6: In the Park)[src]

This is from a poem called "The Lord of Burleigh", by Alfred, Lord Tennyson.[12]

"I ain't scared now to say "if I should die before I wake""
Anne of the Island (Chapter 7: Home Again)[src]

This quote is a reference to the popular eighteenth-century children's prayer, "Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep". Davy says this in reply to Anne after promising not to swear again.[13]

"To sleep Jane went easily and speedily; but though very unlike Macbeth in most respects, she had certainly contrived to murder sleep for Anne"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 8: Anne's First Proposal)[src]

This quote is a reference to Act II, Scene II of William Shakespeare's Macbeth where Macbeth murders Duncan in his bed chamber. Jane had just proposed to Anne on behalf of her brother and was somewhat resentful toward the rejection.[14]

"Stop it Pris. "The best is yet to be." Like the old Roman, we'll find a house or build one."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 9: An Unwelcome Lover and a Welcome Friend)[src]

This quote is a reference to the poem "Rabbi Ben Ezra" by Robert Browning.[15]

"'I feel as if something mysterious were going to happen right away - "by the pricking of my thumbs,"' said Anne, as they went up the slope."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 9: An Unwelcome Lover and a Welcome Friend)[src]

This quote is from line 44 of Act IV, Scene I of Macbeth by William Shakespeare: "By the pricking of my thumbs, / Something wicked this way comes".[16]

"Their names are Gog and Magog. Gog looks to the right and Magog to the left."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 10: Patty's Place)[src]

The names Gog and Magog, the names of Miss Patty's two ornamental china dogs, are taken from Revelation 20:8.[17]

"Girls, dear, I'm tired to death. I feel like the man without a country - or was it without a shadow?"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 10: Patty's Place)[src]

In this quote Philippa is alluding to Edward Everett Hale's short story, "The Man Without a Country" (1863).[18]

"Now you -' 'Toil not, neither do I spin,' finished Philippa."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 10: Patty's Place)[src]

Here Philippa is quoting Matthew 6:28: "Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin".[19]

"The Way of Transgressors"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 13: The Way of Transgressors)[src]

"The Way of Transgressors", the title of chapter 13, is a reference to Proverbs 13:15.[20]

"'I had so,' cried Davy, but in the voice of one who doth protest too much"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 13: The Way of Transgressors)[src]

This quote is a reference to Act III, Scene II of Hamlet by William Shakespeare.[21]

"So spake Anne loftily, little dreaming of the valley of humiliation awaiting her"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 15: A Dream Turned Upside Down)[src]

This quote is a reference to The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan (1678).[22]

"'Oh; Gilbert, not you,' implored Anne, in an et tu, Brute tone."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 15: A Dream Turned Upside Down)[src]

This quote is a reference to the apparent last words spoken by Caesar as he is stabbed to death and recognizes Brutus among the assassins; 'et tu, Brute' was popularized in William Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar. Here Gilbert congratulates Anne on winning the Rollings Reliable prize, much to Anne's dismay over the whole affair.[23]

"What, silent still and silent all?
Oh, no, the voices of the dead
Sound like the distant torrent's fall,
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 16: Adjusted Relationships)[src]

This is from "The Isles of Greece", which is a poem featured in Canto the Third of Don Juan, by George Gordon, Lord Byron. It is the beginning of the eighth stanza.[24]

"But, like Kipling's cat, he 'walked by himself'."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 16: Adjusted Relationships)[src]

This quote is a reference to Rudyard Kipling's short story, "The Cat That Walked by Himself", which appears in the collection of Just So Stories (1902).[25]

"He's a beautiful cat - this is, his disposition is beautiful. She called him Joseph because his coat is of many colours."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 16: Adjusted Relationships)[src]

This quote is a reference to the story of Joseph from the Book of Genesis.[26]

"[Anne] found Avonlea in the grip of such an early, cold, and stormy winter as even the 'oldest inhabitant' could not recall."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 18: Miss Josephine Remembers the Anne-Girl)[src]

This quote is a likely reference to Mark Twain's speech, "The Weather", with a toast to "The Oldest Inhabitant - The Weather of New England".[27]

"What are you reading?" "Pickwick" "That's a book that always makes me hungry,' said Phil. 'There's so much good eating in it. The characters seem always to be revelling on ham and eggs and milk punch. I generally go on a cupboard rummage after reading Pickwick.The mere thought reminds me that I'm starving."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 20: Gilbert Speaks)[src]

Here Anne and Phil are referring to Charles Dickens' first novel, The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836), more commonly known as The Pickwick Papers.[28]

"[Charlotta] wore her hair now in an enormous pompadour and had discarded the blue ribbon bows of auld lang syne"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 23: Paul Cannot Find the Rock-People)[src]

This quote is a reference to Robert Burns' poem, "Auld Lang Syne", which popularized the traditional Scots folk song.[29]

""Nobody axed me, sir, she said" - at least, nobody but that horrid little Dan Ranger"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 25: Enter Prince Charming)[src]

Here Anne references the traditional English nursery rhyme, "Where Are You Going, My Pretty Maid?", while explaining to Aunt Jamesina why she avoided the college football match.[30]

"Silly Phil! You know quite well that Jonas loves you." "But - he won't tell me so. And I can't make him. He looks it, I'll admit. But speak-to-me-only-with-thine-eyes isn't a really reliable reason for embroidering doilies and hem-stitching table-cloths."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 26: Enter Christine)[src]

This quote is a reference to Ben Jonson's poem, "To Celia".[31]

""The woods were God's first temples," quoted Anne softly."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 27: Mutual Confidences)[src]

Here Anne quotes William Cullen Bryant's poem, "A Forest Hymn".[32]

"Were not half the Redmond girls wildly envious? And what a charming sonnet he had sent her, with a box of violets, on her birthday! Anne knew every word of it by heart. It was very good stuff of its kind, too. Not exactly up to the level of Keats or Shakespeare - even Anne was not so deeply in love to think that. But it was very tolerable magazine verse. And it was addressed to her - not to Laura or Beatrice or the Maid of Athens, but to her, Anne Shirley."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 27: Mutual Confidences)[src]

This quote alludes to famous instances of romantic correspondence and the history of the sonnet form, which is commonly used to express love. In the first instance, the Romantic poet, John Keats (b. 1795), famously wrote a number of devoted love letters and sonnets to his fiancée, Fanny Brawne, before his untimely death in 1821.[33] In the second instance, William Shakespeare composed a collection of 154 sonnets, the first 126 to a young man, and the last 28 to a woman.[34] As for the women alluded to, “Laura” is a reference to the mysterious muse to whom the Italian poet Petrarch addressed over 300 sonnets with his undying love, most of which appear in The Canzoniere;[35] “Beatrice” is a Shakespearean character and the subject of Benedick’s sonnet, which he composes in Act V Scene II of the romantic-comedy, Much Ado About Nothing;[36] and the “Maid of Athens” is the title of a love poem written by George Gordon, Lord Byron to the young Teresa Makri while he resided in Greece.[37]

"Gilbert would never have dreamed of writing a sonnet to her eyebrows. But then, Gilbert could see a joke."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 27: Mutual Confidences)[src]

This quote is an allusion to Jacques' "All the world's a stage" speech from Shakespeare's As You Like It; 'And then the lover, / Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad, / Made to his mistress' eyebrow'.[38]

"So wags the world away," quoted Gilbert practically and a trifle absently."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 29: Diana's Wedding)[src]

This quote is a reference to Ellen Mackay Hutchinson's poem, "So Wags the World Away".[39]

"Oh, why must a minister's wife be supposed to utter only prunes and prisms?"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 35: The Last Redmond Year Opens)[src]

Here Phil is quoting Mrs General, the class-conscious governess from Charles Dickens' Little Dorrit, who believes that the phrase "prunes and prisms" will give an attractive and ladylike shape to the mouth.[40]

"A pouring rainy night like this, coming after a hard day's grind, would squelch anyone but a Mark Tapley."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 35: The Last Redmond Year Opens)[src]

In this quote, Anne is referring to the ever cheerful character, Mark Tapley, from Charles Dickens' novel, The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit (1844).[41]

"The roof leaked and the rain came pattering down on my bed. There was no poetry in that. I had get up in the "mirk midnight" and chivvy round to pull the bedstead out of the drip"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 35: The Last Redmond Year Opens)[src]

In this quote, Stella references Robert Burns' 1793 poem, "Lord Gregory".[42]

"Of all sad words of tongue or pen,
The saddest are these: "It might have been!"
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 36: The Gardeners' Call)[src]

This quote is a reference to John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, "Maud Muller".[43]

"Potent, wise, and reverend Seniors," quoted Phil."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 37: Full-Fledged B.A.'s)[src]

Phil adapts the line "Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors," from William Shakespeare's Othello as she reflects on her time at Redmond.[44]

"I've tried the world - it wears no more
The colouring of romance it wore,
"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 39: Deals with Weddings)[src]

Here Anne quotes two lines from William Cullen Bryant's poem, "The Rivulet".[45]

"Weeping may endure for a night but joy cometh in the morning."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 40: A Book of Revelation)[src]

Anne quotes this line from Psalms 30:5 after learning that Gilbert will recover from his illness.[46]

"I've come to ask you to go for one of our old-time rambles through September woods and "over hills where spices grow", this afternoon," said Gilbert"
Anne of the Island (Chapter 41: Love Takes Up the Class of Time)[src]

This quote is a reference to Isaac Watts' hymn, "Who is This Fair One in Distress?".[47]

"But I'll have to ask you to wait a long time, Anne," said Gilbert sadly. "It will be a three years before I finish my medical course. And even then there will be no diamond sunbursts and marble halls." Anne laughed. "I don't want sunbursts and marble halls. I just want YOU. You see I'm quite as shameless as Phil about it. Sunbursts and marble halls may be all very well, but there is more 'scope for the imagination' without them."
Anne of the Island (Chapter 41: Love Takes Up the Glass of Time)[src]

Here a deliberate reference is made by Montgomery to the second chapter of Anne of Green Gables ("Matthew Cuthbert is Surprised") where, like chapter 41 of Anne of the Island, there is an ending and a new beginning for Anne, as she quotes again from Laurence Sterne's A Sentimental Journey and Michael William Blafe's The Bohemian Girl. Yet, as Anne has grown as a character, she no longer relies so heavily on fairy tales, as her other dreams, of being loved and wanted, have been realized.

ReferencesEdit

  1. "The Day-Dream" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  2. The King James Bible (Jeremiah 8:20)
  3. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  4. "Ode to a Nightingale" by John Keats
  5. The King James Bible (2 Corinthians 4:18)
  6. The King James Bible (Exodus 20:16)
  7. "The Sorrows of Werther" by William Makepeace Thackeray
  8. Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (Canto the First, part XIII) by George Gordon, Lord Byron
  9. Lucile (Canto VI, Part VII) by Owen Meredith
  10. "Ye Mariners of England: A Naval Old Ode" by Thomas Campbell
  11. "Dickens in Camp" by Bret Harte
  12. "The Lord of Burleigh" by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  13. "Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep"
  14. Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  15. "Rabbi Ben Ezra" by Robert Browning
  16. Macbeth (Act II, Scene I) by William Shakespeare
  17. The King James Bible (Revelation 20:8)
  18. "The Man Without a Country" by Edward Everett Hale
  19. The King James Bible (Matthew 6:28)
  20. The King James Bible (Proverbs 13:15)
  21. Hamlet (Act III, Scene II) by William Shakespeare
  22. The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan
  23. Julius Caesar (Act III, Scene I) by William Shakespeare
  24. Don Juan (Canto the Third, "The Isles of Greece") by George Gordon, Lord Byron
  25. Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling
  26. The King James Bible (Genesis 37:3)
  27. "The Weather" by Mark Twain
  28. The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
  29. "Auld Lang Syne" by Robert Burns
  30. "Where Are You Going, My Pretty Maid?"
  31. "To Celia" by Ben Jonson
  32. "A Forest Hymn" by William Cullen Bryant
  33. Selected Love Letters to Fanny Brawne by John Keats
  34. Complete Sonnets by William Shakespeare
  35. The Canzoniere by Petrarch
  36. Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
  37. "Maid of Athens, Ere We Part" by George Gordon, Lord Byron
  38. As You Like It by William Shakespeare
  39. "So Wags the World Away" by Ellen Mackay Hutchinson
  40. Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens
  41. Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens
  42. "Lord Gregory" by Robert Burns
  43. "Maud Muller" by John Greenleaf Whittier
  44. Othello (Act I, Scene III) by William Shakespeare
  45. "The Rivulet" by William Cullen Bryant
  46. The King James Bible (Psalms 30:5)
  47. "Who is This Fair One in Distress?" by Isaac Watts
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.